Versatile award

The blogger Mados has nominated me for the Versatile Blogger Award and written some nice things about me and 14 others. There is no actual award. There is: the nomination, the write-up and the opportunity to nominate others.

Here is the link to the Mados blog, http://mados.wordpress.com/2012/08/27/versatile-blogger-award, where you can read about the author and the other nominees – a very interesting read.

 

This is what I am supposed to do:

  1. Thank the person who nominated me – I have but I will again, thank you Mados.

  2. Nominate 15 bloggers, whose blogs I enjoy to read, and notify them. They are below, alphabetically.

  3. Post the Award image. Here it is. versatile award logo

  4. Tell seven things about myself. One, I am female; two, in my 70s; three, English speaking; four, raised Canadian, citizen of UK, living in France; five, educated in bio-science & computers but interested in many things; six, left-handed and dyslexic; seven, blogging.

In my blog I try very hard to keep to one subject, consciousness, and not stray too far from that topic. But for this list I am going to stray and include a few blogs that have nothing to do with neuroscience. I am going to use alphabetical order to avoid appearing to rank the nominees. (I have a built in dislike of pyramids or chain letters etc. I am treating this as just a form of communication, a sort of carnival type of thing, and I insist that my nominees should not feel that I am trying to force them to carry on the chain. They can or not as they please.)

 

Babel’s Dawn http://www.babelsdawn.com

One of the first blogs that I followed and one that convinced me to start my own blog was Babel’s Dawn written by EB Bolles. Nowadays it is less active than it used to be with just occasional posts, because it has resulted in a book by the same name. If you are interested in the origins of language, there are a load of posts to interest you just waiting in the archives of this blog; everything you want to know – the evidence, the theories, the disputes with good manners and good sense.

 

Berry Deep France http://www.fabfrog.com/

Dirk Beauregard is a “late mid-fortysomething journalist cum teacher cum musician trying to carve out an existence in deepest rural France – namely Bourges in the Cher”. This is my nearest town and it is very interesting to have reports on what is happening locally in English. He is a man with an interesting mix of topics and points of view.

 

BishopBlog http://deevybee.blogspot.fr

Deevy Bishop is an Oxford scientist who blogs on many aspects of science in general and neuroscience in particular. I enjoy her style and appreciate her critical approach.

 

Brain Pickings http://www.brainpickings.org/

Maria Popova’s postings are like pages in a scrap book: interesting quotes, lists and facts. “Brain Pickings is a human-powered discovery engine for interestingness, culling and curating cross-disciplinary curiosity-quenchers, and separating the signal from the noise to bring you things you didn’t know you were interested in until you are.”

 

Conscious Entities http://www.consciousentities.com/

The blogger here is identified as Peter. He blogs on the philosophy of consciousness, explaining the theories of many philosophers and his own ideas. This is philosophy but written well enough that it does not put me to sleep. He keeps pretty tightly to consciousness which also is attractive to me and I have learned about a few good viewpoints from this blog.

 

Deric Bownd’s Mindblog http://mindblog.dericbownds.net/

Like Babel’s Dawn, this is another blog that I took to early and tried to use as a pattern. I thought if I can be as useful as Bownd, I will be worth reading. What you get here is an almost daily piece of neuroscience news, presented short-and-sweet, usually with an abstract or similar quote, and no misleading hype. As a bonus he also gives us piano playing from time to time.

 

Language Log http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/

This is a joint effort of more than 20 linguists (Mark Liberman and Geoffrey Pullum among them) somewhat centered around the University of Pennsylvania but with some contributors in other part of the US and in the UK. They comment (always from the linguistic angle) on questions people send them, current events, and recent publications. It is good scholarship but at the same time entertaining. There is something new every day.

 

Mind Hacks http://mindhacks.com/

Tom Stafford and Vaughan Bell contribute to this blog about the news in psychology. (There is a book by Tom Stafford and Matt Webb by the same name). The items they report and comment on come from a wide range of sources and often cover unusual topics. Although their topics are sometimes odd – they are always sensible and trustworthy.

 

The Neurocritic http://neurocritic.blogspot.fr/

Neurocritic writes clearly on the weaknesses in current neuroscience. “Deconstructing the most sensationalistic recent findings in Human Brain Imaging, Cognitive Neuroscience, and Psychopharmacology”.

 

Neurophilosophy http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/neurophilosophy

Mo Costandi blogs for the Guardian newspaper in the UK. He gives very well researched and written articles for the general but interested public, with no sensationalist ‘journalist’ hype or shortcuts.

 

Neuroskeptic http://neuroskeptic.blogspot.fr/

Neuroskeptic does not give a name but says he/she is a neuroscientist in the UK who “takes a skeptical look at his own field, and beyond”. Neuroscience and psychology are prone to faults of various kinds and this blog’s evaluations of research papers are very useful. He is always clear, knowledgeable, and to the point.

 

Oscillatory Thoughts http://blog.ketyov.com/

Bradley Voytek is a neuroscientist who blogs on his science and other quirky things (like zombies).

 

 

Reseach Digest http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.fr/

Christian Jarrett writes these posts for The British Psychology Society Digest. Each post is a straight forward review of a recent paper. It won an award in 2010 for ResearchBlogging (serious blogging on peer reviewed published research). This blog also has a weekly list of papers that have come out that week but were not covered in Jarrett’s postings – very handy. His reviews are very readable.

Sing your own lullaby http://singyourownlullaby.blogspot.fr/

Mariana Soffer’s interests range over much of art, science and technology. Her blogs are thoughtful – no two the same. She spans an English and a Spanish world and is always networking.

 

1513 fusion http://1513fusion.wordpress.com/

This is a quiet blog of poems, photos, artwork, stories and observations by the blogger, Harry Nicholson. He lives in northeast England and is very attached to his surroundings. I suggest you stop in a couple of times and see if this gem of a blog fits your taste. He also has a novel, Tom Fleck, and its publication started his blogging.

 

I should mention where I get the most information for my own blog, although this is not a blog and therefore does not get a award nomination: http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/ . When I find something here that I want to write about, I can follow in up.

 

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